escheator

escheator
/as(h)chiytar/ In English law, the name of an officer who was appointed in every county to look after the escheats which fell due to the king in that particular county, and to certify the same into the exchequer. An escheator could continue in office for one year only, and was not re-eligible until three years. There does not appear to exist any such officer at the present day

Black's law dictionary. . 1990.

См. также в других словарях:

  • Escheator — Es*cheat or, n. (Law) An officer whose duty it is to observe what escheats have taken place, and to take charge of them. Burrill. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • escheator — /as(h)chiytar/ In English law, the name of an officer who was appointed in every county to look after the escheats which fell due to the king in that particular county, and to certify the same into the exchequer. An escheator could continue in… …   Black's law dictionary

  • escheator — /es chee teuhr/, n. an officer in charge of escheats. [1250 1300; ME eschetour < AF. See ESCHEAT, OR2] * * * …   Universalium

  • escheator — noun A royal officer in medieval and early modern England, responsible for taking escheats from deceased subjects …   Wiktionary

  • Escheator — The shire officer, in England, who was responsible for the administration of land grants and feudal rights relating to land and fiefdom. ♦ The royal official responsible for holding inquests on the deaths of tenants in chief to determine who… …   Medieval glossary

  • escheator — es·cheat·or …   English syllables

  • escheator — /əsˈtʃitə/ (say uhs cheetuh) noun an officer in charge of escheats …   Australian English dictionary

  • escheator — An English county officer who looked into and made report of escheats reverting to the king. A public officer or public body upon whom rests the duty of bringing actions for escheat or for a sale or conveyance of escheated lands. 27 Am J2d Esch § …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • escheator — ēd.ər, ēd.ˌȯ(ə)r noun ( s) Etymology: Middle English eschetour, from Anglo French, from Old French escheoit (past participle of escheoir to fall, happen) + our or : a legal officer formerly appointed to look after escheats …   Useful english dictionary

  • Richard Sackville (escheator) — Sir Richard Sackville ( d. 1566) was an English administrator. He was under treasurer of the exchequer, chancellor of the Court of Augmentations, Escheator of Surrey and Sussex in 1541–2. 1544 steward of the archbishop of Canterbury s Sussex… …   Wikipedia


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